RUNNING FAQ

Fitness Score and Points Explained

Points for a workout are calculated using the duration and frequency of the workout. Therefore, the longer the workout and/or higher the intensity, the more points will be allocated. Your Fitness Score, as shown in the dashboard, is calculated using a 6 week moving average of all points received for workouts logged.

5km Training Programme Approximate Fitness Score:

Finish = 18 Fitness Score

10km Training Programme Approximate Fitness Score:

Finish = 35 Fitness Score

21.1km Training Programme Approximate Fitness Score:

Finish = 50 Fitness score
2hrs = 60 Fitness score
1hr30 = 70 Fitness score

Two Oceans Ultra Training Programme Approximate Fitness Score:

Finish = 90 Fitness score
6hrs = 100 Fitness score
5hrs = 105 Fitness score
4hrs = 110 Fitness score

Comrades Training Programme Approximate Fitness Score:

Finish = 85 Fitness score
11hrs = 100 Fitness score
9hrs = 110 Fitness score
7hrs30 = 115 Fitness score

How do I select a training plan?

How do I score my runs manually?

Why are group runs important?

If I don’t belong to a club can I still benefit from the training plan?

If I don’t belong to a club can I still benefit from joining one?

Why are recovery runs/rest important?

How is my training plan structured?

Can I combine runs if I have less time in a week?

Can I change my weeks around?

What if I have less time than the training plan prescribes?

What if I have more time than the training plan prescribes?

Can I change the duration of runs?

If I have to miss one session in the week, which one should it be?

Can I do my training indoors?

Why are pre-race runs important?

How do I estimate my RPE for my run?

1. How do I select a training plan?
Read the training plan description and see which plan best fits in terms of your running experience (i.e.: beginner, novice, intermediate or advanced). Choose a plan based on how many hours a week, and days per week you have available to train.

2. How do I score my runs manually?
Your run should be scored based on RPE values for the entire ride.
Click here to see the workout score terminology and RPE's

3. Why are group runs important?
They give you an opportunity to meet other runners, learn from more experienced runners, keeps you motivated when you know you have people to meet and helps the kilometres tick by on the long runs.

4. If I don’t belong to a club can I still benefit from the training plan?
Yes. Even more so as you will get guidance as to when you should run far, run hard or recover.

5. If I don’t belong to a club can I still benefit from joining one?
Yes. It is highly beneficial and they give you an opportunity to meet other runners, learn from more experienced runners, keeps you motivated when you know you have people to meet and helps the kilometres tick by on the long runs.

6. Why are recovery runs/rest important?
Recovery runs/rest allow your body time to recover and are vital to gaining strength and fitness. Without the recovery process the body can become over-stressed, prone to injury and illness and actually become weaker. Proper recovery promotes your strength and fitness.

7. How is my training plan structured?
Your training plan is divided into 3 essential ‘training blocks’.
a. Foundation phase.
b. Build/ Strength phase.
c. Race Preparation.

(There will be a recovery phase at the end of each phase allows for recovery before progressing to the next phase.)

8. Can I combine runs if I have less time in a week?
It is optimal to do the training plan as it is set out, however you can swap days as so that you can catch up certain sessions as long as you don’t follow long runs with very hard runs or follow very hard runs with long runs. If you have more time on some days you can split sessions into morning and evening sessions without doing to hard a session as one of the sessions.

9. Can I change my weeks around?
No, it is not advisable, as the training plan has been designed in specific training and recovery phases for optimal physiological benefits and fitness gain.

10. What if I have less time than the training plan prescribes?
Make sure you select the correct training plan with correct training time and days per week to begin with. If you struggle to reach your prescribed times your fitness will fall below the ‘goal fitness’. And will indicate you should select a different plan with different gains.

11. What if I have more time than the training plan prescribes?
Make sure you select the correct training plan with correct training time and days per week to begin with. If you have more time available than the prescribed times your fitness will go above the ‘goal fitness’. Be sure to use your recovery runs and rest to recover properly!

12. Can I change the duration of runs?
Yes you can, as long as you try to make it up by adding or reducing the time to another run. You must however make sure that session types remain separate. You shouldn’t increase sessions by much however as they have been designed to follow a progression to reduce injury risk.

13. If I have to miss one session in the week, which one should it be?
If you have to leave out a session, choose the shortest, easiest run in the week as the rest will serve as recoveries.


14.
Can I do my training indoors?
Yes you can. You can use a treadmill or substitute sessions with indoor cycling (particularly with injury) or an elliptical. These options reduce eccentric load so you should still try to do some of your session’s outdoors.

15. Why are pre-race runs important?
These runs are easy so they promote recovery and allow you to start to feel strong and ready for race day. They also keep you feeling loose and “in rhythm” by taking too many days off you start to feel lethargic.

16. How do I estimate my RPE for my run?
Look at the estimated RPE for the run and aim for that on your ride. If you have done the ride exactly as prescribed you can use the estimated RPE/ Intensity.

 Nutritional Guidelines for Runs

To prevent running out of energy and the associated symptoms: dizziness, confusion and/or nausea it is important that your blood glucose level doesn't become depleted. Blood glucose fuels the brain and central nervous system. This is why nutrition while you run is so vital!

1. Aim to take in approximately 300-450ml of energy drink per hour to maintain fluid balance and to provide energy, some will need slightly less and some more so try a few different combinations and let thirst be your guide.

2. During your run, drink 100-150ml every 15-20min based on thirst.

3. Aim to take a gel every hour with 150ml of water, this in combination with the regular energy drinks will allow you to get enough energy per hour.

4. Drinks always taste sweeter the longer you run. So, when mixing a powdered sport drink, make sure you don’t make it too sweet. For long runs plan your route to take you past petrol stations.

5. Eating solid food during long runs is important as it will allow you to continue to use gels and energy drink for longer by giving you a break from all the sweet products on the road – Potatoes, bananas, crisps etc

6. Before a long run or race eat 2-3 hours beforehand to ensure proper digestion. This meal should consist of complex carbs - such as grains, fruits, pasta or bread. Most importantly make sure you are used to eating these types of foods every day before training.

 

General Nutritional Guidelines

Many of us are committed to many hours of training, but forget about how important role nutrition plays when it comes to fuelling your body. It also plays a vital role in your body’s recovery.

As a simple guideline, your daily calories should be as follows:

  • 30% Fruits & Vegetables
  • 30% Bread, Potatoes, Rice, Pasta
  • 15% Meat & Fish
  • 15% Milk & Dairy
  • 10% Fat

Following these guidelines may be one of the most effective means of improving cycling performance!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Feedback

Do you have a training question or a suggestion for the website? Send it to us.

Category:
Name:  
Email:
Comment  
Verification: